Going dairy free - help, advice, suggestions needed.

Oh, we're done with all that vegetable-steaming and mess, our children are cutlery-wielding, spaghetti-chomping angels... at least some of the time.

Going dairy free - help, advice, suggestions needed.

Postby taliac » 10 Sep 2007, 12:37

Hello All,

My 13m dd Piccalilli is a dairy aficionado. There isn't a cheese or yoghurt she won't eat, and my guaranteed way of getting her to eat her veg is to involve cheese, pesto or both in the meal somewhere. Thanks to BLW she's a good and reasonably adventurous eater.

Unfortunately she's had an on and off bad tummy ever since a bout of gastroenteritis a few months ago. In order to get on top of it we've been asked by her paediatrician to go dairy free for a month. She can still have some formula milk but all other forms of dairy are out. We tried giving her soya milk, but it gave her tummy cramps and made her hurl so I'm now reluctant to try soya cheese or yoghurt etc.. So replacing the dairy like for like with soya products is out. But I'm still after the holy grail - a nutritious, balanced diet consisting of food thats delicious so she'll want to eat.. But I'm really running out of ideas. There's only so many times you can serve pasta alternated with meat/fish and potatoes..

Can anyone help? Recipes, products, advice??
taliac
 
Posts: 11
Joined: 10 Sep 2007, 12:10

Postby Aitch » 10 Sep 2007, 22:31

are there no ideas on the recipes bit? things like the fritters and lentil-y stuff? god, i don't know what i'd do if i didn't have cheese... :wink:
Aitch
Site Admin
 
Posts: 5486
Joined: 19 Jul 2007, 20:23
Location: Scotland

Postby taliac » 11 Sep 2007, 09:59

There are of course, and I'm working on introducing some of the fritter, pulse type things..
taliac
 
Posts: 11
Joined: 10 Sep 2007, 12:10

Postby Eleanor » 11 Sep 2007, 10:42

Hi,

My daughter's just a bit younger than yours and is dairy-free because of eczema - but because I've had to do without dairy in her diet from the start I almost don't miss it! Though I must say it's easier now she can have egg.

You'll become a champion label-reader... I was amazed at the amount of things that contain milk powder. (Ordinary-looking bread rolls, for example, and sausages.)

Useful standbys are hummus (I whizz up my own without salt so she can eat as much as she likes) and dippy things like guacamole; veggy sauces or bolognese for pasta (put your own cheese on separately, unless she'll see it and throw a wobbler!); rice milk for cereal/porridge or for general drinking; I keep a tub of organic veg-oil marge in the fridge but to be honest there's usually about one scrape taken out of it by the time it reaches use-by date. P seems quite as happy to eat plain bread or with something like cashew-nut butter. Chinese/Indian style meals are simple to do without anything dairy anyway. And I got used to cooking with olive/sunflower/grapeseed oil instead of butter quite easily.

The one thing I haven't really cracked is family puddings that she can share.
Eleanor
 
Posts: 2198
Joined: 31 Aug 2007, 14:22

Postby Aitch » 11 Sep 2007, 10:55

have you ever roasted or grilled fruits, eleanor? easy-peasy.
http://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/gril ... 98,RC.html
i made the sabayon once, it was a disaster... but the recipe is sound.
Aitch
Site Admin
 
Posts: 5486
Joined: 19 Jul 2007, 20:23
Location: Scotland

Postby Eleanor » 11 Sep 2007, 12:47

Terrific, thanks Aitch! That's the kind of thing I need - recipes that just don't need dairy stuff, instead of trying to work with substitutes.

Taliac - I've found this book by Lucy Burney useful for ideas for alternatives to dairy: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Optimum-Nutriti ... 632&sr=8-1. She's very anti-dairy; she thinks no child ought to be given any cow's milk before a year old anyway. (Not a BLW book though, very puree-ey in the earlier chapters!)
Eleanor
 
Posts: 2198
Joined: 31 Aug 2007, 14:22

Postby Aitch » 11 Sep 2007, 13:23

what about baked apples as well. my pals stuffs them with sultanas and nuts (but i reckon broken ginger biscuits would be LUSH) and does them in the microwave or oven.
Aitch
Site Admin
 
Posts: 5486
Joined: 19 Jul 2007, 20:23
Location: Scotland

Postby taliac » 11 Sep 2007, 16:32

Eleanor - thanks thats really helpful. I'm with you on trying to find recipes that don't involve dairy rather than substituting the dairy. And I know what you mean re label reading - I was huffing to myself in the supermarket earlier while trying to buy tasty breakfast goods - muffins, fruit buns, all the nice stuff has milk in the ingredients.. Yes I know theres nothing wrong with toast or cereal in the am but the Picc and I do normally enjoy sharing the odd currant bun or croissant.. And somehow it seems wrong to be eating things she can't have in front of her! Not least because she points to whatever it is and says "me!" imperiously.

Thanks for the link to the book, I'll try that as one of my worries is keeping to a reasonably balanced diet..
taliac
 
Posts: 11
Joined: 10 Sep 2007, 12:10

Postby catanz » 11 Sep 2007, 19:14

So we too have been dairy free since the beginning, my son is 12mo. Many muffin/cake recipes don't call for milk, so if you have time to make them at home, you can do that-- or subbing rice milk or even water for milk in baked goods works pretty well. i have a recipe for baked oatmeal that i'll post later over in recipes that is a hit here.
I second the votes for hummus, guacamole
We eat a lot of beans and rice, too.
Mayonnaise is dairy free and might help with the veg eating if you make some kind of dip out of it (ok, so not he most healthful food, but replaces some of fat she's losing from cheese)
How about refried beans and guacamole in a flour tortilla (like a quesadilla) toasted in pan with a little olive oil?
Is goat's or sheep's milk cheese OK? You might want to check with the ped about that, that would help:)
And scrambled eggs/omelets, we eat lots of those too.
You can make risotto without the cream/cheese and it is still really pretty good.
Hope this helps:)
catanz
 
Posts: 20
Joined: 11 Sep 2007, 14:10
Location: US

Postby Eleanor » 12 Sep 2007, 15:11

catanz wrote:Mayonnaise is dairy free


Some brands aren't though - another thing where you have to read the labels! Unless you have time to make your own, then you're laughing.

Having to read labels really makes you aware of how processed a lot of everyday foods are. It's been quite an eye-opener for me.
Eleanor
 
Posts: 2198
Joined: 31 Aug 2007, 14:22

Postby catanz » 13 Sep 2007, 10:35

oh so true, eleanor. for instance, reading the ingredient list for store-bought bread crumbs . . . :scream
catanz
 
Posts: 20
Joined: 11 Sep 2007, 14:10
Location: US

Postby realsLINshady » 13 Sep 2007, 20:49

How about polenta? Mix it with veg (I used garlic, onions, mushrooms and spinach) and then bake it in a loaf tin. Cut into slices & freeze. Defrost & stick under a grill.

The lentil & cheese wedge recipe would probably work without the cheese - you could stick in an egg as a binder if its too crumbly.

My sister's carrot, lentil and sweet potato recipe that is on the blog would work well and you could omit the cheese from that one with no problems. A few more breadcrumbs would bind it into a stiffer consistency for making patties.

I make quite a nice couscous bake - make the cousoucs as per recipe instructions, add a load of veg, put half of it in a tin, dollop over with houmous, add rest of couscous veg mix & bake until golden on top. Might not hold together fabulously well but would provide entertainment and a threat to carpet.

As for dessert - I don't know if filo pastry has dairy in it but Small's nursery serves up a baked baklava type dessert with fruit & raisins in it. Would that work out?
realsLINshady
 
Posts: 4925
Joined: 04 Sep 2007, 07:03
Location: Leeds

Postby Eleanor » 14 Sep 2007, 14:31

The ingredients on the filo pastry in my freezer are: Wheatflour, water, vegetable oil, salt, dextrose, potassium sorbate, sodium metabisulphite, maize starch! So no dairy :)

It occurs to me it might be a bit of a crumb shrapnel disaster though!
Eleanor
 
Posts: 2198
Joined: 31 Aug 2007, 14:22

Postby realsLINshady » 14 Sep 2007, 18:39

I hadn't considered the shrapnel aspect but nursery reports that Small deals with it very well. She's not got much in the Tooth Dept so the shrapnel affect can't be too nasty for her gums.

Thankfully I don't have to clean it up.....
realsLINshady
 
Posts: 4925
Joined: 04 Sep 2007, 07:03
Location: Leeds

Postby taliac » 15 Sep 2007, 18:51

Well we're a week and a half in now, and its getting easier..

The trick as you say is label reading, that and actually cooking. I think I'd got out of the habit of proper cooked meals when she went through a fussy phase a little while ago, instead relying on thrown together meals that it didn't hurt to have rejected.. But we've had homemade pasta sauces, stews, shepherds pie, salads, soups, all sorts. Its been demanding but fun. She turned her nose up at the shepherds pie (olive oil mash didn't impress) but everything else has been successful. Beans! She likes beans, thats new. I don't mean baked beans, she's not too fussed about them. But all the other kinds are popular. Even the sprouting ones you get in organic deliveries - she ate those by the fistful in a salad. The ensuing trumpets, well thats another story..

Thanks so much for all your suggestions and meal ideas. I think I got brain freeze at the very idea of cutting out dairy, so it was great to get so much practical help.. Won't say no to any more though so do keep any ideas coming..

thanks again from taliac and the piccallili
taliac
 
Posts: 11
Joined: 10 Sep 2007, 12:10

Next

Return to Toddler Led Eating

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users