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British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

PostPosted: 05 Mar 2012, 20:11
by OnlyAGinger
Yep, I need this - a place where I can figure out what y'all are talking about. I know some words have been clarified, but I'd love to have easy access to more.

So, anything food related or life related, etc, etc, please feel free to add. I will have to scour my old threads to see the words that popped up.

Most recently was 'flapjack' (In America, a pancake - but now I know it's a sweet oat bar)

...more...???

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

PostPosted: 05 Mar 2012, 20:17
by Popsie
Chick peas are garbanzo beans
I think what we call scones are biscuits for you? That is what I can gather based on my reading of American food blogs!

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

PostPosted: 05 Mar 2012, 20:18
by Jem
Not food related, but my favourite misunderstanding of all time is "pants". Because over here pants == underwear but obviously they're trousers over yonder. Hilarious.

(Yes, I am that immature.)

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

PostPosted: 05 Mar 2012, 20:20
by OnlyAGinger
isn't "Pants" also an expression?

too bad we can't compare gestures as well...

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

PostPosted: 05 Mar 2012, 20:21
by RachelS
Lol @ Jem but I agree. ( chortle chortle)

Crisps are potatoe chips.

Chips are Fries.

Courgette= zucchini

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

PostPosted: 05 Mar 2012, 20:23
by Popsie
Yep, if something is a bit crappy/ rubbish/ not very good it is pants.

Fanny.... here it is a ladies ahem, front bottom, but there it is your bum! Bumbag here- fannypack in the US.

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

PostPosted: 05 Mar 2012, 20:24
by Spanner
Quite a few northerners call trousers 'pants' in the UK! Just wondering if you have oat cakes over there? Savoury oaty biscuit eaten with cheese or other toppings.

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

PostPosted: 05 Mar 2012, 20:26
by RachelS
Popsie wrote:Yep, if something is a bit crappy/ rubbish/ not very good it is pants.

Fanny.... here it is a ladies ahem, front bottom, but there it is your bum! Bumbag here- fannypack in the US.



Lol. I love how politely you are describing it! :wink:

Spanner- when I lived in Manchester the Bolton friends used to say pants but over here in Yorkshire it's trousers still.

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

PostPosted: 05 Mar 2012, 20:32
by Louisianablue2000
Aubergine is eggplant
Pissed is drunk, so Americans saying 'I got really pissed at him' always makes me giggle. The correct term would be pissed off
Some Scottish ones:
Tatties are potatoes
Neeps are swede
A Fish Supper is Fish and Chips

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

PostPosted: 05 Mar 2012, 20:37
by Missica+BabyTinks
Jam is Jelly?

I would say that American's dont know what cheese is either because when I bought some in New York it tasted more like rubber. Sorry (I loved the place just not the cheese) hehe

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

PostPosted: 05 Mar 2012, 20:37
by Cait
RachelS wrote:
Popsie wrote:Yep, if something is a bit crappy/ rubbish/ not very good it is pants.

Fanny.... here it is a ladies ahem, front bottom, but there it is your bum! Bumbag here- fannypack in the US.



Lol. I love how politely you are describing it! :wink:

Spanner- when I lived in Manchester the Bolton friends used to say pants but over here in Yorkshire it's trousers still.

Oh now if we're going from American to Boltonian - an american buzz is being a tiny bit tipsy, a Bolton buzz is a form of public transport :D

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

PostPosted: 05 Mar 2012, 20:39
by Missica+BabyTinks
oh and is French Toast what I would call Eggy bread?

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

PostPosted: 05 Mar 2012, 20:41
by BLTMama
LemonMeringuePie wrote:Neeps are swede

And swede is rutabaga. :wink: Although I thought neeps were turnips, so now I'm confused. :?:

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

PostPosted: 05 Mar 2012, 20:45
by Rosie_t_Riveter
Missica+BabyTinks wrote:Jam is Jelly?

I would say that American's dont know what cheese is either because when I bought some in New York it tasted more like rubber. Sorry (I loved the place just not the cheese) hehe


I'm with you on the cheese thing!

The Jam/Jelly thing is more complex. Jam has bits of fruit in it, jelly is smooth. So in my (English) house we have strawberry jam and apple jelly. In the US I struggled to find any preserves with bits of the actual fruit in it, so it is correctly named even if it's a bit weird iyswim.

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

PostPosted: 05 Mar 2012, 20:46
by skip
UK mooch = kind of hanging around, aimless loitering
US mooch = freeloading/shoplifting?

UK suspenders = stretchy over-the-shoulder straps to hold up your trousers (I mean pants)
US suspenders = something to hold up lingerie stockings

UK tights
US pantyhose

UK jumper = US sweater
US jumper = UK pinafore

And UK/UK crochet/knitting conversions drive me Up The Wall...

What are US slang words for being drunk? I seem to remember 'trashed' over there means tired, whereas here it means pissed as a fart. And back to 'pissed', on its own it means drunk over here... How about trollied, arseholed, bladdered, plastered, shitfaced, sloshed..? ;)