British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby jvnt » 06 Mar 2012, 09:09

I've heard paci or binky for dummy, maybe it's regional.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Pics » 06 Mar 2012, 10:29

Aitch - NOW you tell me that you are putting it on a sticky - would you like me to delete my contribution - it's clearly not food related!
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby AwayinaChive » 06 Mar 2012, 10:40

cathyolive wrote:I've been in the UK 8 years now and only just learned about this one the other day:

Owls in the UK say tuweet-tuwoo (or something like that).

Owls in the US say hoo hoo or hoot.

And some Christmas carols have different words to different tunes (O Little Town of Bethlehem, for example).


Yes! I've learned the owl thing in the last couple years. I've been here 10 years and am always learning new words. I will never know the entire British vocabulary. Any new hobby or part of life you get into, there's a whole new vocabulary to learn. It's like a different language. I used to think there was just a bunch of different words, but it's just never ending!

I've recently noticed that people here say 'erm' but never 'um.' So, is erm the British um? Do they pronounce it 'um' and leave out the r in the British 'r' skipping way?
Last edited by AwayinaChive on 06 Mar 2012, 13:35, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby bimbambalooms » 06 Mar 2012, 11:34

I say erm when making a point about someone else's post / behaviour and um when I don't know something!
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby RedRum » 06 Mar 2012, 12:10

BadgersMommy wrote:
LemonMeringuePie wrote:Neeps are swede

And swede is rutabaga. :wink: Although I thought neeps were turnips, so now I'm confused. :?:


According to wikipedia, rutabaga, swede and turnip are all the same thing... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rutabaga

Yam = Sweet Potato right?
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby RedRum » 06 Mar 2012, 12:20

Also, an amusing article here about what = neeps: http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/ ... -or-turnip

ETA: another about the swede/turnip divide. Controversial subject apparently: http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/ ... intcmp=239
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby RedRum » 06 Mar 2012, 12:25

OnlyAGinger wrote:re: swede - hahaha - was thinking maybe flats or pennyloafers (just thought that swede was a different spelling for suede, & in essence, a reference to shoes!)


This is my favourite definition for swede :D
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Wilma » 06 Mar 2012, 12:39

RedRum wrote:
BadgersMommy wrote:
LemonMeringuePie wrote:Neeps are swede

And swede is rutabaga. :wink: Although I thought neeps were turnips, so now I'm confused. :?:


According to wikipedia, rutabaga, swede and turnip are all the same thing... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rutabaga

Yam = Sweet Potato right?


When I lived in Boston you could get Yams and sweet potatoes and apparently sweet potatoes are good for you and yams are not! Could never figure out why as they look the same to me!

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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Aitch » 06 Mar 2012, 12:45

<falls over laughing at Pics> hey listen, it's hands-across-the-ocean time, innit?
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Rosie_t_Riveter » 06 Mar 2012, 12:46

Ha ha Wilma! I was sure I had more of these from living in the States for a year, and you've just reminded me...

Paper Napkin = serviette

We had a party in my French class in America. The teacher said "passe moi la serviette" and while everyone else stood around saying "what's a serviette?" I was looking for one and desperately trying to remember the American name for it. I found one, held it up and everyone said (in unison) "OH! A napkin!"
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby RedRum » 06 Mar 2012, 12:54

rosie_t_riveter wrote:Ha ha Wilma! I was sure I had more of these from living in the States for a year, and you've just reminded me...

Paper Napkin = serviette

We had a party in my French class in America. The teacher said "passe moi la serviette" and while everyone else stood around saying "what's a serviette?" I was looking for one and desperately trying to remember the American name for it. I found one, held it up and everyone said (in unison) "OH! A napkin!"


I say napkin though - I thought it was the other way around...

French press = cafetiere
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Rosie_t_Riveter » 06 Mar 2012, 13:01

I must admit RR that I think they're interchangeable, but I put that down to living in the US for a year. I'm happy to be corrected though! I also use both erm and um, possibly for the same reason?
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby jvnt » 06 Mar 2012, 13:18

RedRum wrote:
OnlyAGinger wrote:re: swede - hahaha - was thinking maybe flats or pennyloafers (just thought that swede was a different spelling for suede, & in essence, a reference to shoes!)


This is my favourite definition for swede :D


More on shoes, pumps are shoes with heels, I always thought they were trainers.

Oh and corn dog is a hot dog in a doughnut batter onna stick, not a veggie version of a hot dog - ah, the discovery on biting into that!

Queue = line. I think line works in England but queue didn't work for me in America.

My friend always says she finds it cute when English people say rubbish, she thinks it sounds much better than garbage.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby RedRum » 06 Mar 2012, 13:32

jvnt wrote:More on shoes, pumps are shoes with heels, I always thought they were trainers.


In my mind pumps are ballet pumps - kind of flat courts I guess.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby AwayinaChive » 06 Mar 2012, 13:34

Travellingmum wrote:Uk : Jelly
US : Jello
from what I gather it isn't used really as a dessert thing...more as something when you are unwell, or for Thanksgiving to go with the turkey... (or at least my American friends anyway...)

UK : Jam
US: Jelly... !


Jello is a desert! And not for Thanksgiving to go with turkey! Didn't I serve you cranberry sauce? That's like jam I guess, but weird calling it that, cause it's cranberry sauce.
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