British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby FestiveTidings » 26 Apr 2014, 19:43

So the phrasebelt and braces" isn't common in the US/Canada then? :)
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Brigitte » 28 Apr 2014, 05:37

FestiveTidings wrote:So the phrasebelt and braces" isn't common in the US/Canada then? :)


I don't even know what you're talking about, actually. Explain?

In Canada, suspenders are for pants (not underwear "pants", nor lingerie...yikes this is getting convoluted!).

Braces are on your teeth, or possibly if you've had a knee injury you might wear a brace on your knee.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby jvnt » 28 Apr 2014, 07:49

It means being extra safe or taking extra precautions - you can wear a belt or braces (suspenders) to hold your trousers up but if you wear both they definitely won't fall down!
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Brigitte » 28 Apr 2014, 21:06

jvnt wrote:It means being extra safe or taking extra precautions - you can wear a belt or braces (suspenders) to hold your trousers up but if you wear both they definitely won't fall down!


I see! That makes sense.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby blackberrycrimble » 19 Jun 2014, 20:06

Table food. This is one that tickles me a bit, I'm not sure why. I think I know what it means - proper meal type food?
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby StJuniper » 19 Jun 2014, 20:38

Yes. Food you'd eat at the table versus watery mush for the high chair crowd, I guess?
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Treeb » 19 Jun 2014, 20:59

Yes, really just any normal people food. The term can also be used when giving human food to your pet dog.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Cns2n8 » 31 Jul 2015, 00:45

You all are in need of a good ole American. Here I am! I'm gonna go through here and answer the questions I've see.

Actually suspenders are the same, but ours are usually made of denim. We don't call the things that hold up lingerie suspenders. But they kinda look like them.

I don't know what the heck a pinafore is.

Trashed means really drunk. We use shitfaced, plastered, and sloshed. "Pissed" means you're angry.

Other drunk term: wasted.





skip wrote:UK mooch = kind of hanging around, aimless loitering
US mooch = freeloading/shoplifting?

UK suspenders = stretchy over-the-shoulder straps to hold up your trousers (I mean pants)
US suspenders = something to hold up lingerie stockings

UK tights
US pantyhose

UK jumper = US sweater
US jumper = UK pinafore

And UK/UK crochet/knitting conversions drive me Up The Wall...

What are US slang words for being drunk? I seem to remember 'trashed' over there means tired, whereas here it means pissed as a fart. And back to 'pissed', on its own it means drunk over here... How about trollied, arseholed, bladdered, plastered, shitfaced, sloshed..? ;)
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Cns2n8 » 31 Jul 2015, 00:47

This was new for me. We call them ladybugs. You all call them ladybirds?
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Cns2n8 » 31 Jul 2015, 00:54

Oh man we've gotten creative with jello over here. The brand name jello is "gelatin dessert." So jello = gelatin. That's what the jello box says. We don't really use it as a dessert, although when we do, it can be terrifying. Check it out: http://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/cour ... ad-recipes

We also combine it with alcohol and use it do jello shots. Instead of water, you mix with vodka and let it solidify in a small cup in the fridge. Then take it like a shot.

Also, is it true cinnamon is an American thing and you all think we are obsessed w it?

TravellingMum wrote:Uk : Jelly
US : Jello
from what I gather it isn't used really as a dessert thing...more as something when you are unwell, or for Thanksgiving to go with the turkey... (or at least my American friends anyway...)

UK : Jam
US: Jelly... !
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Cns2n8 » 31 Jul 2015, 01:00

We also fry everything here. Name it.

Fried Oreos, fried pickles, fried ice cream.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Cns2n8 » 31 Jul 2015, 01:06

And do you all call it swimming pools?
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Brigitte » 31 Jul 2015, 05:46

Cns2n8 wrote:And do you all call it swimming pools?


Ha, "you all", what an American thing to say! :) We Canadians and any other English speakers I'm aware of just say "you" and leave it at that.

I worked with a guy from Texas once at a camp program for kids (here in Canada). One kid answered a quiz question correctly, and he announced, "That's right! Y'all get a prize!" and the entire camp broke out in cheers because they all thought they were getting prizes. Apparently in Texas, "y'all" means you (singular), and if he had meant you (plural) he would have said "all y'all". :)

Is there any other word for swimming pools anywhere? I know what a swimming pool is, but I'm not aware of any other word for it.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Treeb » 31 Jul 2015, 09:45

It definitely depends on what area of the US you are from also. I'm from the north east and would never say "you all" and definitely not y'all or "all y'all". I say "you guys" instead. :D
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Lily » 31 Jul 2015, 15:54

Brigitte wrote:
Cns2n8 wrote:And do you all call it swimming pools?


Is there any other word for swimming pools anywhere? I know what a swimming pool is, but I'm not aware of any other word for it.


Some Brits call them swimming baths, especially older people and those from northern England. 'Baths' is a term you can only apply to indoor pools, which is mostly what we have here, given our weather. Some older public pools are properly named baths - my DH learned to swim at Splot Baths in Cardiff, which I think is the best named pool ever. Outdoor unheated public pools here can also be called lidos; they're also usually older (pre-WWII) and situated in parks or by the sea.
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