British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Treeb » 25 Nov 2013, 21:48

Here's a new one for me. Someone just mentioned "pencil crayons" in the advent calendar thread, which I'd never heard of. A bit of thinking and I realized this is probably what we would refer to as "colored pencils".
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Brigitte » 26 Nov 2013, 03:01

Treeb wrote:Here's a new one for me. Someone just mentioned "pencil crayons" in the advent calendar thread, which I'd never heard of. A bit of thinking and I realized this is probably what we would refer to as "colored pencils".


Yep. We call them pencil crayons here in Canada.

Another thread has also just made me aware of the words "trump", "pump", and "parp" as child-friendly words for flatulence. I have never heard these words used in Canada. However, "toot" and "fluff" are familiar if not used often. "Fart" is the most common word used here, although in formal settings one might prefer to say one has "passed gas", or if course avoid mentioning it at all.

In that same fart thread, someone said "twee". What does that mean?
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby shye » 26 Nov 2013, 07:57

twee is hard to explain...my understanding of it (as a canadian in the uk) is cheesy, kitsche kind of thing....
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby AntiRuth » 26 Nov 2013, 08:47

bacon in Australia is really long ( the streaky and the back joined!) just the back part is called shortcut. That said it's not very good, more like ham than bacon!
I'm in Aus, originally from UK
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Nix » 26 Nov 2013, 09:53

I love this thread-so fascinating!
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby jvnt » 26 Nov 2013, 10:08

AntiRuth wrote:bacon in Australia is really long ( the streaky and the back joined!) just the back part is called shortcut. That said it's not very good, more like ham than bacon!
I'm in Aus, originally from UK


I always thought this - it is much pinker than British bacon and not like raw meat at all - it seems partially cured. I never got on with it either.

Twee is overly cute.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby busmother » 26 Nov 2013, 13:03

Twee is overly cute.

Think over the top chocolate box country cottage with lots of chintz and frills and florals.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby StJuniper » 26 Nov 2013, 13:06

busmother wrote:
Twee is overly cute.

Think over the top chocolate box country cottage with lots of chintz and frills and florals.

I've definitely heard it used here, most often in reference to Zooey Deschenel.
Mama to two boys, the Scout Kid P, 02/26/12 and the Feral Kid R 12/15/13, and one little Tumbleweed girl, 05/27/16.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby StJuniper » 26 Nov 2013, 13:08

My post won't post! I didn't use the k word...
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby ToothFairy » 26 Nov 2013, 13:41

I've approved it for you StJ, no idea what's going on there!
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Brigitte » 27 Nov 2013, 04:11

SaintJuniper wrote:
busmother wrote:
Twee is overly cute.

Think over the top chocolate box country cottage with lots of chintz and frills and florals.

I've definitely heard it used here, most often in reference to Zooey Deschenel.


Thanks for all the explanations! I think I'm catching on :)
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Cazfay » 26 Apr 2014, 10:47

UK suspenders = stretchy over-the-shoulder straps to hold up your trousers (I mean pants)
US suspenders = something to hold up lingerie stockings

Not quite right

UK suspenders also hold up your stockings (we do wear stockings and suspenders in the UK)
It's BRACES that hold up your trousers / pants
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby StJuniper » 26 Apr 2014, 11:32

Suspenders also hold up pants here, but braces are only for your teeth.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Treeb » 26 Apr 2014, 11:45

I'm in the US and have only heard of suspenders as straps to hold up your pants. I don't pay attention to lingerie enough to know the terms for things. And like StJ, braces are for your teeth.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Marrow » 26 Apr 2014, 13:02

Braces can also mean brackets ({[]}) <--- like these
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