British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Whatever you like, really, knock yourself out... I'm not the boss of you.

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby jvnt » 06 Mar 2012, 03:15

Turtle'sMammy wrote:
Popsie wrote:Yep, if something is a bit crappy/ rubbish/ not very good it is pants.

Fanny.... here it is a ladies ahem, front bottom, but there it is your bum! Bumbag here- fannypack in the US.

There's a lingerie shop in a nearby city called "Fanny Wrappers". Makes me PMSL every time I see it.


There's a clothes shop here called Wanko which makes me smile when I go past :-)
jvnt, mother to The Boy, August '09, Baby Dragon, January '12 and HP May '14.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby OnlyAGinger » 06 Mar 2012, 03:17

isn't a beaker something used for a science experiment? the name of a muppet? mee-mee-mee-mee...
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby skmille » 06 Mar 2012, 03:19

Missica+BabyTinks wrote:I would say that American's dont know what cheese is either because when I bought some in New York it tasted more like rubber. Sorry (I loved the place just not the cheese) hehe


"American cheese" is indeed disgusting, but please don't judge all of our cheese by that one experience. Try some Wisconsin cheese instead. :)
Sara, mom to DS (09/09), BLW since 04/2010
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby OnlyAGinger » 06 Mar 2012, 03:23

skmille wrote:
Missica+BabyTinks wrote:I would say that American's dont know what cheese is either because when I bought some in New York it tasted more like rubber. Sorry (I loved the place just not the cheese) hehe


"American cheese" is indeed disgusting, but please don't judge all of our cheese by that one experience. Try some Wisconsin cheese instead. :)


hahaha, skmile, you must be a cheesehead!! totally agree w/ you - American cheese is preposterous! ;-)

we should not be judged by it. our sharp cheddar is to be revered!
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby cvious » 06 Mar 2012, 03:34

OnlyAGinger wrote:isn't a beaker something used for a science experiment? the name of a muppet? mee-mee-mee-mee...


what I picture exactly! I know LO would love a tall glass beaker.
Mama to Strawberry, sprouted July 2010, and Baby Bird, June 2013
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby babylexsmommy » 06 Mar 2012, 05:15

nurseymum wrote:i thought malteasers where malted milk balls in the states??


Yes, this is right. I think badgers mommy was calling all malted milk balls whoppers but whoppers is just a brand of malted milk balls covered in chocolate. Not all malted milk ball candies are whoppers iyswim?
Mama to Lex -Sept. 2010, Lana and Lane -July 2014
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby BLTMama » 06 Mar 2012, 05:20

Yeah, it's like Kleenex or Jello or Popsicles (tissues and jelly and ice lollies -- ARGH! -- things for which brand names have become the de facto general name. Band-Aid? Q-Tip? Any of these translate?). I was just being lazy and didn't want to type "malted milk ball" all the way out. :wink:
♥ Mom to Badger Dec 2009 and Little Tarsier Jun 2013 ♥
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Allium » 06 Mar 2012, 06:53

BadgersMommy wrote:Yeah, it's like Kleenex or Jello or Popsicles (tissues and jelly and ice lollies -- ARGH! -- things for which brand names have become the de facto general name. Band-Aid? Q-Tip? Any of these translate?). I was just being lazy and didn't want to type "malted milk ball" all the way out. :wink:


We do similar things with other words/brand names, but although I know what all those are, we would call them plasters/cotton buds/tissues etc. Actually I didn't know jello was a brand name...so is the product itself called jelly like it is here? Jelly as in kids' party food that wobbles rather than something you spread on toast.
Mummy to Twink - 8/05/08, Squishy - 7/02/10 & Flopsy 1/11/12
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby twilightfan » 06 Mar 2012, 07:12

cvious wrote:
OnlyAGinger wrote:isn't a beaker something used for a science experiment? the name of a muppet? mee-mee-mee-mee...


what I picture exactly! I know LO would love a tall glass beaker.


Yes, I think I've heard of a beaker used in science experiments, I remember them being glass too (though its been a long time since I was at school). I think we also use the same word to describe children's beakers because they are kind of similar in that they don't (ususally) have handles, I think!
DS born 2010 and BLW since July 2010
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Rosie_t_Riveter » 06 Mar 2012, 08:22

Band aid = plaster
Q-tip = baby bud/cotton bud I think.

I call the ice lollies you get in a tube of plastic (so no stick) Popsicles. Ice lollies require a stick IMHO.

Hoover = vacuum cleaner and can be a verb.
TheWriggler - Aug 2009
BabyBean - March 2012
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby fourweewonders » 06 Mar 2012, 08:32

rosie_t_riveter wrote:Band aid = plaster
Q-tip = baby bud/cotton bud I think.

I call the ice lollies you get in a tube of plastic (so no stick) Popsicles. Ice lollies require a stick IMHO.

Hoover = vacuum cleaner and can be a verb.


the ones in plastic are ice pops imho. nurseydad a brummy calls them something really weird but i cant remember what ~ we get into stupid debates over this every summer.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Cait » 06 Mar 2012, 08:42

A beaker - technically any drinking vessel without handles (or one of those things you find in a science lab), but over here it's quite often a generic term for a baby / toddler cup.
Pootle - May 2011 (after a long time trying)
Doing whatever works for us whenever I know what that is and with Green & Black's white chocolate whenever possible.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby TravellingMum » 06 Mar 2012, 08:43

Uk : Jelly
US : Jello
from what I gather it isn't used really as a dessert thing...more as something when you are unwell, or for Thanksgiving to go with the turkey... (or at least my American friends anyway...)

UK : Jam
US: Jelly... !
Mum to Little Panda and Wee Monkey
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Nix » 06 Mar 2012, 08:55

We say pants to mean trousers up here in Manchester!

Pacifier = dummy
Diaper = nappy
Very proud mummy to three little stars:

Harvey born January 2009
Jasper born October 2010
Pippa born January 2013
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby pimento » 06 Mar 2012, 09:08

I've been in the UK 8 years now and only just learned about this one the other day:

Owls in the UK say tuweet-tuwoo (or something like that).

Owls in the US say hoo hoo or hoot.

And some Christmas carols have different words to different tunes (O Little Town of Bethlehem, for example).
Big E - Jan 2011
Little E - Feb 2013
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