British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby wacky12 » 23 Mar 2012, 19:08

yup, canned tomato sauce is passata...... sort of. Passata has been strained so there are no seeds, but canned tom sauce may still have seeds in it in north america.... *rubs hands together while cackling evilly* but they can be used interchangably. :-)

A Spanish/Mexican Flan (a variation on Creme brullee) is completely different than a British/American dessert.

And HArtley's Jelly in the UK is less fruity tasting than Jello brand jelly in Canada.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Wilma » 23 Mar 2012, 19:54

Been thinking about this alot as it comes up in day to day speech

Lorry (UK) = Truck (US)

After living in the US for 3 years I now keep calling lorries, trucks and even call W's bin lorry toy a garbage truck more often than not. I'd never call a lorry a truck before living there!
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby LucyL » 23 Mar 2012, 21:53

Wilma wrote:After living in the US for 3 years I now keep calling lorries, trucks and even call W's bin lorry toy a garbage truck more often than not. I'd never call a lorry a truck before living there!


Here in South Africa it is called a rubbish truck. But given that most of our books come either from the UK or US, Bookworm informs me every time we see one that it is also a garbage truck and a dustbin lorry!
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Antje » 24 Mar 2012, 03:31

wacky12 wrote:a' flan' has a sponge base with pastry creme and fruit on it. any other base that the filling is prepared before putting in the base is a tart. if the base and filling are cooked together then its a pie. sweet ones only of course. according to pastry chefs i have worked with.


This is precisely my understanding of "flan," and I'm from Canada.

My husband and I disagree about the definition of "tomato sauce" and it has led to some interesting results when one of us writes it on a shopping list for the other to purchase! Maybe this isn't a British/American confusion at all, then, as we're both Canadian.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby blackberrycrimble » 24 Mar 2012, 04:26

Lol Antje!

Re flan - in the 1970s in the south of England, flan, whilst also being the spongey fruit pudding, was used to refer to what we now call 'quiche'.

How did I get to the last day of this trip before being reminded of the salad coming first thing?!
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby oriel » 24 Mar 2012, 08:43

'Tomato sauce' is ketchup to me.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby wacky12 » 24 Mar 2012, 15:13

I hear that one less and less, used to hear 'tomato sauce' for ketchup all the time.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby babylexsmommy » 27 Mar 2012, 04:47

LemonMeringuePie wrote:As long as you don't use wanky for wacky you'll be OK.

Hmmm wanky? Should I even ask, or just take your word for it and steer clear?
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby blackberrycrimble » 27 Mar 2012, 10:32

Ahem

Wank = masturbate (male sort usually)
Wanker = used as general derogatory term for men who are... well...tossers. unpleasant people.
Wanky = something that is distasteful.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby OnlyAGinger » 27 Mar 2012, 17:18

also, i think i've heard of drinks like Crystal Lite (powdered sugar-free, like Kool-Aid) referred to as 'soft drinks' by some, although I tend to think of soft drinks as carbonated soda(pop)(sodapop...).
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby VanillaPickle » 29 Mar 2012, 23:12

Describing weather as 'brass' = so cold brass monkeys are falling out of trees (northern English expression)
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby skip » 30 Mar 2012, 06:32

VanillaPickle wrote:Describing weather as 'brass' = so cold brass monkeys are falling out of trees (northern English expression)


Here's a convoluted one for you on the same theme:

"I'm a bit George" = George Michael from wham = 'wam' = liverpudlian for 'warm'

My sister went to uni in Liverpool and had a whole load of bizarre slang and phrases...
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby ToothFairy » 30 Mar 2012, 06:38

I lived in Liverpool for 6 years and never heard that one Skip!!
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby jvnt » 30 Mar 2012, 09:02

skip wrote:
VanillaPickle wrote:Describing weather as 'brass' = so cold brass monkeys are falling out of trees (northern English expression)


Here's a convoluted one for you on the same theme:

"I'm a bit George" = George Michael from wham = 'wam' = liverpudlian for 'warm'

My sister went to uni in Liverpool and had a whole load of bizarre slang and phrases...


Dh says that too
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby skip » 30 Mar 2012, 12:57

ToothFairy wrote:I lived in Liverpool for 6 years and never heard that one Skip!!


Ha! I did wonder if it was a random uni thing... She also said pash for a snog, and sheets for (paper) money.
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