British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Whatever you like, really, knock yourself out... I'm not the boss of you.

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Turtle'sMammy » 05 Mar 2012, 20:47

Popsie wrote:Yep, if something is a bit crappy/ rubbish/ not very good it is pants.

Fanny.... here it is a ladies ahem, front bottom, but there it is your bum! Bumbag here- fannypack in the US.

There's a lingerie shop in a nearby city called "Fanny Wrappers". Makes me PMSL every time I see it.
Mother to T, July 2008 & A, June 2012
http://turtleturtleturtle.wordpress.com/
Turtle'sMammy
 
Posts: 2758
Joined: 18 Jan 2009, 02:10
Location: From Ireland, living in California

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby BLTMama » 05 Mar 2012, 20:53

skip wrote:
What are US slang words for being drunk? I seem to remember 'trashed' over there means tired, whereas here it means pissed as a fart. And back to 'pissed', on its own it means drunk over here... How about trollied, arseholed, bladdered, plastered, shitfaced, sloshed..? ;)


Plastered and shitfaced are common here, and I've definitely heard sloshed. I'd think drunk for trashed before tired, although it could go either way. Others are wasted, skunked, stumbling, loaded, smashed, <some number of> sheets to the wind (although maybe only my dad says that), on a bender...
♥ Mom to Badger Dec 2009 and Little Tarsier Jun 2013 ♥
BLTMama
 
Posts: 3243
Joined: 05 Jun 2010, 15:23
Location: Idaho!

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby BLTMama » 05 Mar 2012, 20:55

skip wrote:UK suspenders = stretchy over-the-shoulder straps to hold up your trousers (I mean pants)
US suspenders = something to hold up lingerie stockings

Isn't this garters?
♥ Mom to Badger Dec 2009 and Little Tarsier Jun 2013 ♥
BLTMama
 
Posts: 3243
Joined: 05 Jun 2010, 15:23
Location: Idaho!

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby MrsC » 05 Mar 2012, 20:57

Probably an obvious one but-

In British English 'wean' means to gradually change from a purely milk diet to adult meals.

In American English 'wean' means not giving milk anymore. (at least not as a food).

I hope I've explained that correctly.



I thought British English suspenders held up your stockings. Braces hold up your trousers.
3 year old twins, 1 year old toddler.
MrsC
 
Posts: 518
Joined: 22 Mar 2010, 20:18
Location: North West, UK

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Cait » 05 Mar 2012, 21:00

BadgersMommy wrote:
skip wrote:
What are US slang words for being drunk? I seem to remember 'trashed' over there means tired, whereas here it means pissed as a fart. And back to 'pissed', on its own it means drunk over here... How about trollied, arseholed, bladdered, plastered, shitfaced, sloshed..? ;)


Plastered and shitfaced are common here, and I've definitely heard sloshed. I'd think drunk for trashed before tired, although it could go either way. Others are wasted, skunked, stumbling, loaded, smashed, <some number of> sheets to the wind (although maybe only my dad says that), on a bender...


And rat-arsed?
Pootle - May 2011 (after a long time trying)
Doing whatever works for us whenever I know what that is and with Green & Black's white chocolate whenever possible.
Cait
 
Posts: 1351
Joined: 27 Oct 2011, 21:30

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby skip » 05 Mar 2012, 21:03

MrsC wrote:I thought British English suspenders held up your stockings. Braces hold up your trousers.


Hmm, have I got it the wrong way round? I've never worn either... ;)
skip
 
Posts: 10976
Joined: 17 Jan 2009, 23:15
Location: UK

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby ToothFairy » 05 Mar 2012, 21:04

skip wrote:
MrsC wrote:I thought British English suspenders held up your stockings. Braces hold up your trousers.


Hmm, have I got it the wrong way round? I've never worn either... ;)


Definitely suspenders for stockings, braces for trousers. You can also get sock suspenders...
Mummy to M - September 1998, D - October 2007, and E - May 2010. All BF, cloth nappies, and carried in the same sling, not sure BLW existed in the 90s though!
ToothFairy
 
Posts: 12408
Joined: 11 Apr 2008, 21:44
Location: corsham, wiltshire

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby BLTMama » 05 Mar 2012, 21:10

The food ones I notice here a lot:

mince = ground beef
digestives = Graham crackers
beetroot = beets (kinda obvious, but just in case)
caster sugar = superfine sugar (not powdered sugar)
butter beans = lima beans (I think)
sultanas = raisins (maybe just golden raisins -- clarification, anyone?)
fish fingers = fishsticks
chorizo = always Spanish, never Mexican


Also, self-rising flour seems to be way more common over there than here, so if you're looking at a recipe that you think should have some leavening and it doesn't, it's a good bet that "flour" = self-rising flour and not AP flour.


In case this cake sounds interesting, I'm pretty sure Maltesers are more or less Whoppers.
♥ Mom to Badger Dec 2009 and Little Tarsier Jun 2013 ♥
BLTMama
 
Posts: 3243
Joined: 05 Jun 2010, 15:23
Location: Idaho!

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby fourweewonders » 05 Mar 2012, 22:01

i thought malteasers where malted milk balls in the states??

as for works meaning drunk you can pretty much any word to mean drunk if you put it in the sentance I got absolutly.......last night, we did this alot in uni university which is college in the states, college in the uk is usually a place for 16-18 year olds between school and university, but just to confuse matter many high school are trying to make them sleves sound more important by renaming themselves colleges.
Mum to B (b.sept 2006) & E (b.sept 2009) and R & A (b.july 2011).
fourweewonders
 
Posts: 5324
Joined: 19 Mar 2010, 15:07
Location: yorkshire

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Pics » 05 Mar 2012, 22:27

A good friend of mine was brought up in the US and suddenly realised his mistake when he told me 'Everytime we are mealnt to meet up Pics, you always blow me off'
In the UK that would be MUCH better phrased as 'blow me out' . My morals were not quite that loose ........
Mummy to 3 scrumptious BLWers, who sometimes rebel + ask for spoonfeeding (2007, 2010, 2013). Antilop chair, slings, cloth nappies, no steam mop but awaiting permission for special handshake which probably involves porridge.
http://www.slingtastic.com
Pics
 
Posts: 7618
Joined: 23 Nov 2007, 14:41
Location: wiltshire

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby ToothFairy » 05 Mar 2012, 22:33

PMSL Pics :D :D :D
Mummy to M - September 1998, D - October 2007, and E - May 2010. All BF, cloth nappies, and carried in the same sling, not sure BLW existed in the 90s though!
ToothFairy
 
Posts: 12408
Joined: 11 Apr 2008, 21:44
Location: corsham, wiltshire

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Allium » 05 Mar 2012, 22:37

If I heard skunked or loaded I'd think it was drugs rather then alcohol induced. Suspenders/suspended belt holds up your stockings, braces hold up your trousers, a garter is a decorative piece of frilly elastic that I've never heard of anyone wearing except for on their wedding day, but it does go over a stocking (not usually both?).

My American aunt used to call her handbag a pocketbook which confused me no end...in what way is it a book??!! And a cot is something with bars on where babies can sleep, rather than a bed for grown ups (my parents got that one wrong when they took me to the states when I was one!!).

The thing about words to describe how drunk you are always reminds me of the Michael McIntyre show - I'm absolutely bungalowed/completely and utterly gazeboed...think of a word at random & turn it into a verb...hey presto it describes your drunkenness!

Do you really not have self raising flour? Over here plain flour & self-raising are sold side by side. Is all purpose flour just plain flour then? Do you have bread flour too?

Lol at Pics!! I just love the way our languages are so close, and yet the potential for misunderstandings is MASSIVE!!
Mummy to Twink - 8/05/08, Squishy - 7/02/10 & Flopsy 1/11/12
Allium
 
Posts: 4401
Joined: 16 Sep 2008, 15:54
Location: Milton Keynes

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Aitch » 06 Mar 2012, 00:20

i have just linked to this thread on the front page of the site, so that any noobs can interpret what y'all are saying. so no embarrassing us now... ;)
Aitch
Site Admin
 
Posts: 5486
Joined: 19 Jul 2007, 20:23
Location: Scotland

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby OnlyAGinger » 06 Mar 2012, 03:01

Well, Girls, I'm feeling a bit more clarity in some ways, and completely confuddled in others ;-)

re: swede - hahaha - was thinking maybe flats or pennyloafers (just thought that swede was a different spelling for suede, & in essence, a reference to shoes!)

re: drunk: blitzed comes to mind as well - just did a quick search, and i would agree w/ these: hammered, loaded, trashed, polluted, wasted, wrecked...kissing the porcelain goddess is also a common happening in these situations, tbh

i did buy self-raising flour, but it seems like a pain to use - i'm better off w/ your straightforward all-purpose or whole wheat flours, then i can add baking soda (bicarbonate of soda, right?) / baking powder.

just made malt loaf today, which, btw, had to use malted milk powder, not malt extract b/c i don't know where to find it over here...& muscovado sugar is light brown sugar.

oh, and if i 'blow up' at y'all, it's b/c i've had a really bad day.... ;-)
OnlyAGinger
 
Posts: 582
Joined: 08 Jun 2011, 02:13

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby cvious » 06 Mar 2012, 03:12

I'm not sure what a beaker is... I thought it was just a cup, but then someone asked in a thread about using a beaker for milk "do they even make beakers large enough?" and I was totally confused. Is it not just any kind of cup?
Last edited by cvious on 06 Mar 2012, 03:15, edited 1 time in total.
Mama to Strawberry, sprouted July 2010, and Baby Bird, June 2013
cvious
 
Posts: 416
Joined: 15 Feb 2011, 09:04
Location: USA

PreviousNext

Return to Random Thoughts

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users