British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby blackberrycrimble » 21 Mar 2012, 14:01

Yes, what Oriel said. Plus 'sweets' to me means what you'd call 'candy'. Those def aren't cake or pudding.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby jvnt » 21 Mar 2012, 14:22

To me sweets are any small wrapped sweetie type thing that isn't chocolate which is it's own thing, so I think American candy is any chocolate or sweets? Sweets aren't pudding and neither is cake unless you are having it at the end of a meal (before or after the cheese course depending on whether you're French or not) but as well as a course pudding is also a thing, cooked in a pudding bowl i.e steak and kidney pudding or syrup pudding...

Confused yet?
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby BLTMama » 21 Mar 2012, 14:28

I think this is West Coast regional, but I would basically never use the word sweets at all -- just candy or dessert (or the specific name of something). So that's simple, anyway. :wink:
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby blackberrycrimble » 21 Mar 2012, 14:31

Ah yes jvnt you are right, had forgotten candy included chocolate.

Of course sometimes pudding is referred to as 'sweet' singular. But I haven't heard that for a long time.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Louisianablue2000 » 21 Mar 2012, 18:23

elaruu wrote:In australia, "traybakes" are called "slices". Sorry, I know this is a british/american translation thing, but thought I'd say anyway....


We'd understand that, in fact I suspect among non-bakeers that would be more common, I'm sure Mr Kipling sells slices :D
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby oriel » 21 Mar 2012, 18:37

I'd only say 'slices' as part of 'cream slices': whipped cream sandwiched between two jam-spread pieces of puff pastry, with icing on top. (Or I might offer someone a 'slice of cake', I suppose.)
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby OnlyAGinger » 21 Mar 2012, 20:47

ps,elevenses?
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby ToothFairy » 21 Mar 2012, 21:02

OnlyAGinger wrote:ps,elevenses?


Elevenses - a cup of tea and a piece of cake or a biscuit at 11am :D
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Riotproof » 21 Mar 2012, 21:10

ToothFairy wrote:
OnlyAGinger wrote:ps,elevenses?


Elevenses - a cup of tea and a piece of cake or a biscuit at 11am :D

Did you not watch Lord of the rings?


I still think squash is funny. Here, it's either a vegetable it a sports game, but in the uk it's cordial.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby OnlyAGinger » 21 Mar 2012, 22:05

Riotproof wrote:
ToothFairy wrote:
OnlyAGinger wrote:ps,elevenses?


Elevenses - a cup of tea and a piece of cake or a biscuit at 11am :D

Did you not watch Lord of the rings?


Ha, now you've connected the dots for me!!!
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby babylexsmommy » 22 Mar 2012, 18:37

Hope this isn't already on here I didn't have time to read them all.
car boot= trunk
Loo=toliet
are these right I just saw them in another topic and I guess there pretty easy to figure out but it always gives me a chuckle
Oh! And I see wonky on here alot and I started using it as wacky..hope that's right,hee hee i just love the way it sounds :D
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Eli » 22 Mar 2012, 18:57

wonky as I understand it means something is askew
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby AwayinaChive » 22 Mar 2012, 19:50

Yeah, wonky is like crooked I think.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Louisianablue2000 » 22 Mar 2012, 20:49

As long as you don't use wanky for wacky you'll be OK.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby elaruu » 23 Mar 2012, 00:36

Riotproof wrote:
I still think squash is funny. Here, it's either a vegetable it a sports game, but in the uk it's cordial.


Ahhh yes, 'tis funny. But we also have "Pub Squash", ie a fizzy lemon drink.

What I found reeeeeeeeeeaaaally funny when I first went to Scotland (not sure if it's the whole of the UK or just Scotland), is that they call fizzy drinks "juice"!! WTF??? The first time I found this out was when at the work cafeteria they had a deal that was whatever the "meal of the day" was plus a can of juice! I asked my friend which juices you could get (ie real juice) because they were different sizes, and he pointed out the cans (coke, lemonade, irn bru etc). I found that so weird as it in no way resembles juice!

Actually it seems "juice" is used to describe pretty much any drink I think. I had a friend who used to give her baby water in a sippy cup but call it juice!! Why???



FYI whoever is interested, in australia fizzy drinks are called soft drinks, even though technically soft drink refers to anything not alcoholic, generally if someone says soft drink they mean coke, lemonade, etc etc.
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