British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Turtle'sMammy » 19 Mar 2012, 20:34

Hersheys has an aftertaste of puke.
Almond joys are like Bounty, but with an almond.
Dove is Galaxy.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Antje » 20 Mar 2012, 04:10

Turtle'sMammy wrote:Hersheys has an aftertaste of puke.


YES! Finally someone who agrees with me! Every time I mention this, people say I'm exaggerating. I totally get the puke aftertaste, it kind of burns at the back of your throat.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby jvnt » 20 Mar 2012, 04:49

Antje wrote:
Turtle'sMammy wrote:Hersheys has an aftertaste of puke.


YES! Finally someone who agrees with me! Every time I mention this, people say I'm exaggerating. I totally get the puke aftertaste, it kind of burns at the back of your throat.


me too, i so get that.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby blackberrycrimble » 20 Mar 2012, 05:04

Cait wrote:Eating Hersheys is a real sacrifice! Now, can you find something close to Graham Crackers for us? Digestives just aren't it and you can't make a good s'more with anything I've tried.


Mission accepted.

I could only find honey flavoured graham crackers, so hope that is ok. And you are right, they are not equivalent to digestives. The closest thing I can think of in the uk is rich tea, but these (Graham's) are made with a more wholemealy flour, I think. They are more crumbly too.

I also accepted my own mission to confirm my observation from previous trips that a 'milky way' here is actually more of a mars bar. I can confirm it is still so.

I will be joining the shred/weight loss threads on my return.
My peas are gone as well as my marbles.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby oriel » 20 Mar 2012, 14:18

Someone told me today that what Americans call 'flapjacks' is actually a stack of pancakes! Is this true?

(For me, 'flapjacks' are traybakes made with oats, butter and brown sugar, with dried fruit/nuts/chocolate/seeds/muesli to taste.)
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Antje » 20 Mar 2012, 14:36

Canadians don't say "flapjacks" much, but my understanding is that they're the same thing as pancakes. I've never heard of whatever you're describing. What does "traybake" mean?
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby AwayinaChive » 20 Mar 2012, 14:40

Turtle'sMammy wrote:Hersheys has an aftertaste of puke.
Almond joys are like Bounty, but with an almond.
Dove is Galaxy.


Dove is Galaxy????? So all my life I was living with Galaxy bars all around me and eating them probably on Halloween, and never knew it?? I moved here and Galaxy became my favourite thing.

And yeah, flapjacks are another name for American pancakes (fluffy kind)
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Louisianablue2000 » 20 Mar 2012, 18:33

Antje wrote:What does "traybake" mean?


A traybake is something baked in a square or rectangular tin and then cut into pieces before being served so e.g.brownies would be a traybake whereas the same recipe baked in a round tin and sereved in one pice would be a 'cake'.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby wacky12 » 20 Mar 2012, 18:58

flapjacks tend to have a very thick batter and a lot of baking powder in them so they rise quite high, like a 1/2" easily. Think they are more like a drop scone.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Antje » 21 Mar 2012, 01:16

LemonMeringuePie wrote:
Antje wrote:What does "traybake" mean?


A traybake is something baked in a square or rectangular tin and then cut into pieces before being served so e.g.brownies would be a traybake whereas the same recipe baked in a round tin and sereved in one pice would be a 'cake'.


I see your traybake and raise you some squares.

"Squares" is an umbrella term we use for things like brownies or any other dense (only an inch or so thick) dessert (aka "pudding" :D ) you bake in a rectangular cake pan and cut into squares before serving.

"Cake" however is a different texture, lighter than squares, and generally 2 or more inches thick. The shape has nothing to do with it.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby blackberrycrimble » 21 Mar 2012, 02:56

Hmmm no, traybakes/ any type of cake are not pudding, they are cake!

Love this thread.
My peas are gone as well as my marbles.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby elaruu » 21 Mar 2012, 03:03

In australia, "traybakes" are called "slices". Sorry, I know this is a british/american translation thing, but thought I'd say anyway....
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Antje » 21 Mar 2012, 05:39

bananacustard wrote:Hmmm no, traybakes/ any type of cake are not pudding, they are cake!

Love this thread.


Wait, what? Did I misunderstand "pudding"? Do you only use "pudding" to talk about sweets at the end of a meal, but not sweets in general? This is all getting very complicated for my sleep-deprived brain...
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby oriel » 21 Mar 2012, 07:38

Antje wrote:
bananacustard wrote:Hmmm no, traybakes/ any type of cake are not pudding, they are cake!

Love this thread.


Wait, what? Did I misunderstand "pudding"? Do you only use "pudding" to talk about sweets at the end of a meal, but not sweets in general? This is all getting very complicated for my sleep-deprived brain...


Yes, that's right. You can have cake for pudding, but the same cake served for elevenses or afternoon tea is just cake.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby oriel » 21 Mar 2012, 07:50

Oh, and by the way, these are flapjacks:

http://allrecipes.co.uk/recipe/25724/si ... pjack.aspx
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