British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Whatever you like, really, knock yourself out... I'm not the boss of you.

Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby OnlyAGinger » 07 Mar 2012, 14:44

after birth, at the hospital, Lovebug stayed in the 'special care nursery' - not the level of a PICU, just extra support.
i have heard of friends saying that they're painting/decorating the nursery.
definitely familiar w/ nursery/greenhouses for plants
nursery school - more formal education - maybe a term not used as much, i think, but still more educational.
i send Lovebug to daycare, not nursery - isn't that how it's worded in the UK - 'LO goes to nursery'?
also, nursery rhymes, nursery songs - they must overlap, since we have so many of British origin, right?!
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby sparkling » 07 Mar 2012, 15:01

OnlyAGinger wrote:i send Lovebug to daycare, not nursery - isn't that how it's worded in the UK - 'LO goes to nursery'?

Yes, Jiglet goes to nursery, the equivalent to what you'd call daycare. For 3 & 4 year olds it's slightly more formal and might be called preschool or nursery.

And babysitter - here that's usually used for someone who looks after children for a few hours, on an informal/occasional basis. The impression I get is that in the US babysitter is also used for more formal childcare in somebody's home, what we'd call a childminder, is that right?
Jiglet, Mar'09 & Bell, Jan'12
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby OnlyAGinger » 07 Mar 2012, 15:12

we also use preschool.
babysitter - can be someone who comes to your house or where you drop off your child during the day, if while working, you might call that person a babysitter if she doesn't claim on taxes(?). if she does, perhaps formally called a daycare provider(?). ooh, stickiness...
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby BLTMama » 07 Mar 2012, 15:15

Babysitter is pretty informal here, too -- more the teenager down the block than a professional. We'd say nanny for someone who watched a child regularly at your house, and again day care for something outside of the home, even if it's just a woman who watches a few children in her own home. We might say "home daycare" to distinguish from a large "daycare center".

x-posted with OAG -- agree that it's pretty grey.
♥ Mom to Badger Dec 2009 and Little Tarsier Jun 2013 ♥
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Louisianablue2000 » 07 Mar 2012, 20:06

UK: post
US: mail

My Mum got into terrible trouble in Canada for telling someone their house was homely, apparently it means unattractive there, she thought she was complimenting them on how comfortable it was.
See DD1's first few meals here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/louisianab ... 629434614/
See DD2's weaning video here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/louisianab ... 826217940/

DD1 Dec 07, DD2 June 09, DS Sept 12
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Cait » 07 Mar 2012, 21:53

US kegels = UK pelvic floor exercises.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby bimbambalooms » 07 Mar 2012, 22:13

Cait wrote:US kegels = UK pelvic floor exercises.


Ha thx Cait, that just save me from Googling that one after seeing Biddy's thread :)
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby DIMDongMerrily » 13 Mar 2012, 22:06

Totally random but.. there's now a link to this thread on the front page of the main website and when I clicked it just now it took me to the top of page two, where there's a post about a shop called 'Fanny Wrappers'. Just made me chuckle because people will probably click it expecting helpful translations of weaning terms, and they'll get 'Fanny Wrappers' instead :wink:
Mummy to the Ragamuffin since 01/07/09 and the Small Boy since 30/07/11 ♥ ♥

http://themess-canwait.blogspot.com/
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby KateGladTidings » 13 Mar 2012, 22:11

ah yeah, it does! maybe aitch ought to change the link so it goes to top of page 1....
Mother to R, June 2009, and E, May 2012

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Twitter: @LondonWAToddler
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Aitch » 13 Mar 2012, 23:43

arf. maybe i should...
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby blackberrycrimble » 19 Mar 2012, 03:35

In the interests of scientific enquiry <cough>, I bought a packet of whoppers today (cent quote on phone but a few pages back there was a discussion of whether they were the same as maltesers). I can report that they are similar but do taste quite different. They are sweeter than maltesers and less malty. More like a crunchie type taste/texture. Apols to lovely US friends but also the chocolate is hersheys which is the most unchocolately chocolate I've ever tasted. Makes dairymilk seem Belgian.

All that said they can't have been too bad as the packet didn't last long.

Ah the sacrifices I make for the forum!
My peas are gone as well as my marbles.
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby ToothFairy » 19 Mar 2012, 06:18

Thanks for your hard work BC :D
Mummy to M - September 1998, D - October 2007, and E - May 2010. All BF, cloth nappies, and carried in the same sling, not sure BLW existed in the 90s though!
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Wilma » 19 Mar 2012, 11:15

Taking one for the team BC! :)
W's Ma since July 2010
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby Cait » 19 Mar 2012, 20:30

Eating Hersheys is a real sacrifice! Now, can you find something close to Graham Crackers for us? Digestives just aren't it and you can't make a good s'more with anything I've tried.
Pootle - May 2011 (after a long time trying)
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Re: British-English to American-English 'translation' thread

Postby OnlyAGinger » 19 Mar 2012, 20:33

LOL!!!
not particularly fond of whoppers, but I think i've had them in a recipe before (maybe crushed & put in ice cream?) & they were then acceptable.
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