Baby Led Weaning

Hub2dee's Porridge Pancakes

by Administrator

Hub2dee is a chap, although I didn't immediately twig that. He posts on Mumsnet (and he's not even a mum… they are very lax about these sort of things.)

Anyway, there had been some discussion on Mumsnet of the Glaswegian tradition of lining a kitchen drawer with baking parchment and pouring leftover porridge into it to be eaten later when it had set. Much of the discussion had centred, most irritatingly, around the 'grossness' of such a practice, to which I should have replied that if you were devastatingly poor, oppressed by slum landlords and working a hard day in a shipyard you maybe weren't so precious about these sorts of things but I didn't cos I was too chicken.

Anyway, Hub2dee went away and thought about this recipe in the context of Baby Led Weaning, bless him, and came up with this fantastic 'recipe' for porridge pancakes. There aren't any measurements, it's a bit trial and error-tastic but the babies love them. I've posted a photo of Babybear enjoying some in the Photos folder.

Basically, put a thin layer (oh I don't know, 4mm deep) of porridge oats into a round flat bowl (I have a tupperware which fits the bill and has a lid for keeping in the fridge, hurrah.)

Then add enough expressed breast milk or water to cover. If you are formula feeding then you can do as I do and add a scoop of formula powder to the mix before adding the water. Give it a wee stir, smooth over and stick it in the microwave for about a minute, sometimes more, sometimes less. Depends on your bowl, your microwave and your baby's personal taste.

You should be left with a solid pancake that looks a bit dried-out and flap-jacky on the top. DO NOT touch it or fanny about with it, leave it alone, it needs to cool and set.

I tend to make one up at night before I go to bed then stick it in the fridge, so that when we get up I can peel it (well, it really is just the skin of the porridge which I appreciate is un petit peu gross) and cut it into segments and feed it to the baby.

Apparently you can add things to the porridge, cheese, fruit etc, but I think I like the simplicity of the original recipe. We made it with cheese once and the baby ate it but I thought it was a bit stinky and it fell apart more easily. Oh, and if I'm making some to go out I don't bother with the milk.

As you know I don't yet have much of a clue about allergies (phew) but I believe that although oats do contain gluten it's not the freaky-deaky coeliac disease kind so I use these as a bread substitute. You can spread Philly or hummus on them to your heart's desire.

(As a complete aside, you would not BELIEVE what the 'renowned childcare expert Gina Ford' is doing to Mumsnet. She's trying to get them closed down cos some of their members had a pop at her. Have a look at www.mumsnet.com if you don't believe me…)

Post Script
We have recently discovered that the desirability of the porridge pancake is entirely dependant on the quality and nature of the porridge. We had been using some fancy-schmantzy organic oats from Sainsbury's to make them and they turned out brilliantly, all light and porridgey but still held together well. Cut to the horror of the Scott's Porage Oat… a Jock classic and I'm ashamed to admit absolutely keech for making these pancakes. The oats seem to be five times as large as the ones from Sainsbury's and so they fall apart immediately. They don't even seem to absorb the milk that well, and as for the mess… one porridge pancake can wreak absolute devastation and havoc… they're going back in the cupboard for Anzac biscuits and I'm going back to Sainsbury's as soon as I get a minute.

Post Post Script. Where does it say on the recipe that you should cover the dish with clingfilm? Nowehere, that's where. Yet one of the mothers who most complained that she could not get this recipe to work has just sent me this image as evidence. Can you spot the mistake, pancake fans?

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